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Posts Tagged ‘social media’

Mastering programs like Excel, Powerpoint or languages ​​like Java or PHP, are easily added to a resume. Skills that are crucial anchor points for recruiters. But how to validate these skills? During an interview a recruiter might be able to find out more about to what extent a job seeker is familiar with Google Analytics or the use of Twitter for example. But since these online tools are developing and changing rapidly, there is a need to validate these skills.  Smarterer, a start-up from Boston, has come up with a solution.

Smart, smarter, smarterer
By making them answer 10 questions, Smarterer puts applicants to the test. Within 60 seconds or faster, you have to choose one of the multiple-choice answers. If you answer correctly, then the next question will be one of a more difficult level and vice versa. The final score is benchmarked with all other participants. So the better the competition, the lower your score turns out. The consequence of the benchmark model is that users need to maintain their score. Because if more people do the test, your score is going to change as well. My score – see badge below – was initially 470 and see where it is now…

Crowdsourced
Whether it’s for Matlab, Final Cut Pro or Outlook, all questions are created by users themselves – crowdsourced – and approved by the team of Smarterer.  CEO Jennifer Fremont-Smith told me that everyone is free to add a test. Multinational corporations, small businesses and software developers, whether they speak French or Spanish. “Just make sure you mention the language in the title”, Fremont-Smith said.

Every test needs a minimum of 20 questions.  However, Smarterer is making an effort at this moment to approach experts to come up with questions as well whenever the creator could think of a few questions but not up till 20.  According to Fremont-Smith, ‘pending’ tests do need to be interesting enough for a large audience in order for Smarterer to proactively search for more input.  After the minimum of 20 questions, applicants who want to obtain a higher score can add questions themselves as well.  Users who do, are rewarded with a higher score.

Badge
Fee Naaijkens's Score in LinkedIn

After 10 questions you will get a score between 1 and 800. You can either choose to continue and improve your score or stop at that point. You might even want to publish a badge on your LinkedIn profile or another (digital) resume to show off!  So with only one click the recruiter will see right away what your level is with a certain program compared to other (so-called) specialists.

Currently Smarterer is still in beta. In June 2011 the company received an investment of $ 1,250,000 of  True Ventures and Goolge Ventures.

Do you have an idea for a test or just want to see how smart you are? Click on the badge for an invite.

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A few weeks ago a campaign for the Dutch Railways (NS) which I managed for Co Unlimited received an advertising award: a SAN Accent.

This social media recruitment campaign included training nine management trainees on how to blog and use twitter as an ambassador for the company. But what was in it for them? And what exactly did we want from them? Most of these trainees were not familiar with writing a blog or using Twitter as a professional networking tool at all. Moreover, they were just getting comfortable in their new role as a management trainee…

It's still premature to scream out loud that we're well prepared for winter #wintermaatregelen #NS, but up til now I'm kind of proud!

Taking away fear
Of course, explaining that a blog and Twitter are useful tools to build your professional network is one thing. But letting them experience it themselves is another. (more…)

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MonsterImagine you’re a publisher with one or maybe two job boards in your portfolio. How do you respond to the way recruiters shift their budget to social media? Do you decrease your prices and wait until this social media hype is over? Or do you integrate Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook in your strategy?

Not an easy assignment for media titles that make money out of selling job ads and subscriptions to their resume databases. According to an article in the Wall Street Journal, 80% of the recruiters say they are going to use employee referrals and Facebook and LinkedIn instead of spending the money on ads on job boards. And according to my own little research, 48% of the recruiters in the Netherlands say they’re going to cut the budget for job boards this year. No wonder, some job boards therefore consider social media as their biggest threat.

Monster’s social media strategy
On the 22nd social media breakfast, Kathy O’Reilly, Director of Social Media Relations at Monster, explained how the company embraces social media and sees it as an opportunity. She shared some great insights on how Monster is incorporating social media in its day-to-day operations.

First of all, Monster calls itself a powerful job matching engine instead of just a job board. Their social media objective is to increase traffic by engaging with users through Twitter (@monsterww) and Facebook, plus giving them career advise (@monstercareer). Not just by pushing job vacancies to their fans or followers, also by helping out job seekers and employers who experience difficulties using their online services. Like many other companies, Monster integrates social media into their customer service strategy.

Not a vacuum
So who is responsible for these social media activities? According to O’Reilly social media shouldn’t exist in a vacuum. Therefore the social media team is part of the Marketing & Communication department. It exists out of 4 people. In addition they appointed some members in other departments. How she knew who to pick? Simple, a questionnaire was spread internally, which researched the level of engagement on social media of the employees. Those who already interact with audiences on Facebook or Twitter in a responsible and genuine manner, are well on their way to become ambassadors anyway. Why not make them part of the team? Monster is even thinking about certifying certain employees as official ambassadors.

Learn them how to drive
To make sure everybody is on the same page, Monster took the IBM social media guidelines as an example. They organize toast & tweet masters in order to talk about the do’s and don’ts. They give each other tips about what blogs to read, like Mashable, Social Media Today or Social Media Explorer for example. However, you do need one core group within the organization who enables these learning processes. In other words, somebody needs to give them the key so they can learn how to drive.

For my Dutch readers: Lauri Koop, VP eCommerce Europe at Monster Worldwide also explains the way Monsterboard integrates social media on Marketingfacts.

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Poster at Brookline HighLast week, I read an article in the New York Times about a phenomenon called ‘sexting’. In other words: adolescents sharing  pictures of themselves via their smartphones. And as the term ‘sexting’ suggests, these pictures usually reveal more skin than is advisable during puberty.

Three teens from Lacey were actually charged after texting a nude picture of a girl to everybody in their contact list. It took them just a few seconds.

While I was walking through the corridors at Brookline High School, this poster caught my eye. I guess the next generation learns the rules of social media the hard way…

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Before I left Amsterdam, I had lunch with an former colleague, Michael Minneboo. Out of the blue he asked me if he could interview me about my blog and what it was about. Since it was only five days before our departure to Boston, I wasn’t really prepared for this question. However, Michael managed to make this video out of it. Well done, Michael!

I almost forgot, one of my main questions at that time was whether organisations in Boston integrate social media more easily in their business strategies or not.

My first impression
After three months, I have noticed that I could visit events, meetups or seminars where marketeers, community managers, PR and other communication professionals get together on a weekly basis, if I wanted to. Discussing social media strategies, sharing best practices or other valuable information.

In addition, all restaurants and cafés have a Twitter handle, a Facebook page and provide special offers on Foursquare. Hospitals use social networking tools to inform patients. Social media policies are integrated in introduction programs for employees. An incubator like MIT turns Cambridge into a breeding place for innovative start-ups like no university in the Netherlands is capable of. (I sincerely hope the TU in Eindhoven is, one day). Start-ups and communication agencies all seem to have a blog, which is regularly updated and not only by the junior PR executive. And the entire team, including the CEO, is engaging with audiences on Twitter.

On the other hand,  most corporations still struggle with transparency. 25% of the companies ban social media at work, compared to only 8 % in the Netherlands…

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social media ROISocial media tools come and go quicker than ever. On the 22nd social media breakfast in Boston I’ve learned about a bunch of new tools that I’ve never heard of before. Or let me put it this way: there is a lot more out there then Hootsuite, Tweetdeck or Tweetreach.

Because I’m sure many of you might want to know about these social media tools as well, I listed them below.

Some of these tools (try to) measure social media ROI, others provide you with social CRM or are able to schedule your tweets in a smarter way. I haven’t checked them all out myself, yet. So see for yourself what it can do for you and if it works out for your business. And – maybe even more important – find out if it fits your budget, because not all of them are free…

So here they are, the social media tools to check out:

There is no such thing as a tool that meets the needs of all companies. Besides, the possibilities to measure social media engagement can change overnight. That’s why big companies like Monster.com don’t sign up for any long term agreements with vendors. According to Kathy O’Reilly from Monster.com many vendors are willing to provide you with a free-trial.

Other panelists who contributed to this list of social media tools are Janet Aronica from oneforty, Ben Boardman from Marketwire & Sysomos and Forrester analyst Zach N. Hofer-Shall.

Want to add tools to the list? Please feel free to drop a line in the comments.

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[..] So, I’m like, what is he saying?
Like,
if I don’t like to work hard?
Or like,
that I’m not like one of these students
he likes?
But if I’m like, you know….
…what he’s like,
then like,
what would I be like? […]


Is this the Facebook-generation talking, or what?

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