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Posts Tagged ‘social media guidelines’

On the 20th and the 21st of July Bill Boorman (@BillBoorman) organized TRU Boston (The Real Unconference) which was held at Bullhorn, a software agency for staffing and recruiting. Those of you who’ve been to TRU in Amsterdam before, probably remember Bill and his stunning appearance.  Well, he still looks good, in a yellow  T-shirt with Dutch slang on it.

Back to the content. Because that’s what it’s all about. Whether in employer branding, on your blog or in a resume.

Work life balance
As for work life balance goes, I realized a 4 day workweek isn’t as common in the US  as in the Netherlands. First of all, simply because the Labor Code requirements eliminate most employers and employees from choosing schedule options such as part-time and compressed workweeks. Plus, most corporate companies still think physical presence of their employees is the only guarantee that they are working. Start-ups seem to be the exception here. Since many of them start with a virtual office, they even require new hires to know how to manage or work in this kind of environment.

LinkedIn and Facebook
While recruiters usually spend a lot of money on the services LinkedIn provides, there are also a few tools that aren’t that well known, which are free to use. Like  LinkedIn Signals which makes it possible to search through updates from users, on keywords like unemployed.

A great example on how to engage with your candidates is the way Deloitte in New Zealand used their Facebook page. On a livestream young professionals where telling their Facebook fans how their life has changed after they graduated and how they experience their first job, at Deloitte of course. These ambassadors also met up with graduates during campus recruitment activities. No, not on the traditional job fairs, but on a BBQ on campus!

Engaging with these candidates through social media, seems to be more effective than spending the budget on traditional recruitment advertising. UPS only spends 3% of their recruitment media budget on print, according to Mike Vangel. More about the UPS case and the importance of tracking social media in this video.

How to convince corporate to go social
However engaging with candidates through social media still needs a lot of time and effort. Not only from social recruiters or employer brand managers, the management needs to trust their employees as well. Your recruiters hired these people, right? That means they understand the concept of appropriateness, whether it is in the elevator at the watercooler or on Facebook. Don’t confront them with the rules and regulations that state they’re not allowed to say anything on the company’s behalf. They are grown-ups who can take their responsibilities and use common sense. Trust them.

A social media policy therefore should not be longer than one sentence stating something like: don’t burn bridges or don’t put anything out there that you don’t want your mother to see.

Once the managements fear is turned into trust, don’t think that those employees who were enthousiastic from the start will become active bloggers, and use Twitter and Facebook and engage with potential candidates immediately. Many of us have experienced that they also needed reinsurance after the kick-off meeting that they are not going to be fired for writing a blogpost.. ..

Educational gap
One of the other things that was mentioned in several tracks is that there is a gap between education and the requirements graduates need  in their first job. Offering students internships from an earlier age, could decrease this gap. According to Mark Babbitt, founder of  Youtern “nobody ever graduates from a music major without having played the instrument, but students do graduate for a business major without having stepped foot in a business department.” More on this in the video internships, employability and career services

These were just a few topics that we discussed on TRU Boston. In short, it was an inspiring event for everybody in the recruitment, HR or employer branding business. It made me wonder, why isn’t there a meetup group yet for professionals who work in these industries in and around Boston? Well…. the idea of starting such a group also came up, so in the near future @leanneclc and I might start one. What do you think, are you in? Let us know!

Also check out these other posts and videos on TRU Boston:

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MonsterImagine you’re a publisher with one or maybe two job boards in your portfolio. How do you respond to the way recruiters shift their budget to social media? Do you decrease your prices and wait until this social media hype is over? Or do you integrate Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook in your strategy?

Not an easy assignment for media titles that make money out of selling job ads and subscriptions to their resume databases. According to an article in the Wall Street Journal, 80% of the recruiters say they are going to use employee referrals and Facebook and LinkedIn instead of spending the money on ads on job boards. And according to my own little research, 48% of the recruiters in the Netherlands say they’re going to cut the budget for job boards this year. No wonder, some job boards therefore consider social media as their biggest threat.

Monster’s social media strategy
On the 22nd social media breakfast, Kathy O’Reilly, Director of Social Media Relations at Monster, explained how the company embraces social media and sees it as an opportunity. She shared some great insights on how Monster is incorporating social media in its day-to-day operations.

First of all, Monster calls itself a powerful job matching engine instead of just a job board. Their social media objective is to increase traffic by engaging with users through Twitter (@monsterww) and Facebook, plus giving them career advise (@monstercareer). Not just by pushing job vacancies to their fans or followers, also by helping out job seekers and employers who experience difficulties using their online services. Like many other companies, Monster integrates social media into their customer service strategy.

Not a vacuum
So who is responsible for these social media activities? According to O’Reilly social media shouldn’t exist in a vacuum. Therefore the social media team is part of the Marketing & Communication department. It exists out of 4 people. In addition they appointed some members in other departments. How she knew who to pick? Simple, a questionnaire was spread internally, which researched the level of engagement on social media of the employees. Those who already interact with audiences on Facebook or Twitter in a responsible and genuine manner, are well on their way to become ambassadors anyway. Why not make them part of the team? Monster is even thinking about certifying certain employees as official ambassadors.

Learn them how to drive
To make sure everybody is on the same page, Monster took the IBM social media guidelines as an example. They organize toast & tweet masters in order to talk about the do’s and don’ts. They give each other tips about what blogs to read, like Mashable, Social Media Today or Social Media Explorer for example. However, you do need one core group within the organization who enables these learning processes. In other words, somebody needs to give them the key so they can learn how to drive.

For my Dutch readers: Lauri Koop, VP eCommerce Europe at Monster Worldwide also explains the way Monsterboard integrates social media on Marketingfacts.

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Elk zelfrespecterend Amerikaans bedrijf heeft een social media beleid. Nederlandse organisaties beginnen langzaamaan ook in te zien dat een gedragscode over het gebruik van Twitter, Facebook, Hyves en LinkedIn geen onnodige luxe is.

Voor intermediair.nl schreef ik onlangs een artikel waarin vijf grote werkgevers uitleggen waarom zij een social media beleid introduceren, wat daar in staat en hoe dat wordt toegepast. Opvallend is dat geen van de geïnterviewden zich zorgen maakt over de productiviteit van werknemers die tijdens werkuren online actief zijn – ongeacht of dat werkgerelateerd is of niet.  Want:  ‘Werk begint toch ook al lang niet meer  stipt om 9 uur. En mijn privéleven is niet opeens om 5 uur begonnen.’ Social media beleid is dus gewoon onderdeel van het nieuwe werken.

Lees meer in het artikel dat ik schreef voor intermediair.nl

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